Which city, state, and country consumes the most coffee, and why?

Have you ever thought while sipping your morning cup of Joe, which city or state or country consumes the most coffee in the world? You might say, the country which produces the most should be the one consuming it highest, right? Wrong! At first, even we thought the same, but as it turns out, Brazil which is the highest producer of coffee in the world is at the last in the list of 10 top countries consuming the most coffee in the world. 

Additionally Read: 30 Best Gifts For Coffee Lover.

Worldwide over 150 million bags of coffee is consumed in a year or over 10 million tons of coffee a year. It is believed that it was in Yemen somewhere around in the middle of the 15th century, we find the earliest evidence of coffee being used as a beverage. But the country which consumes the most coffee in the world is neither Yemen nor Brazil. 

According to stats provided by the International Coffee Organization(ICO), it’s Finland that consumes the most coffee in the world. The reports suggest that per person consumes 12 kilos of coffee per year. But what is the reason behind it? 

Why Finns Drink So Much Coffee?

Why Finns Drink So Much Coffee?

In Finland, 80% of the population drink lightly roasted coffee beans compared to other nations where people prefer dark roasted coffee. But today, many of the Finns have shited their taste to dark roasted coffee which is brewed from a coffee machine such as Maccamaster. Espresso is still new there and is not found in households like in the USA. If you want to grab an espresso then you can look for it in the local cafes there. The majority of the people haven’t even heard of espresso or cappuccino. For them, “kahvi” (coffee in Finnish) is the only drink they know of which is consumed both at home and workplaces. 

Like any person in the entire world, Finn people also start their day with a morning cup of filter coffee, but it is the habit of having an afternoon coffee as soon as they get back home from work makes them different. If you have or thinking of visiting Finland in the near future, don’t be surprised by the stained corridors of the workplace by coffee spills. It’s a very normal thing to see in that country because almost everyone is walking around with a cup of coffee in that country. Also, did you know that Finland is the only country in the world that has a clause in their labor agreement that states that every employee should be allowed to have two 15 minutes coffee break during office hours? 

Divided By Breaks, United By Coffee

Divided By Breaks, United By Coffee

A normal Finn’s day is divided into coffee breaks. Their day starts with a cup of coffee, then another cup after lunch, then another coffee break with their colleagues, and after office hours you can find these people enjoying another cup in their free time. The strange thing is that elderly people even drink a cup of coffee in the evening to have a good night’s sleep. There are even different words for the coffee consumed at the different parts of the day such as, “aamukahvi” which means morning coffee, “päiväkahvi” day, or afternoon coffee, “iltakahvi” meaning an evening coffee, and “saunakahvi” meaning sauna coffee. 

Silent You And Your Coffee

Silent You And Your Coffee

Finnish people are really fond of being silent. In Finland, you can have your coffee with your friends or colleague but yet can be in total silence while enjoying your cup of a favorite beverage. And, we think that’s just beautiful. 

There is a custom in Finland to offer coffee when somebody comes over to your place. It is considered rude if you refuse someone’s offer, especially rude if that offer is from an elderly person. Other than Finn people enjoying their morning, afternoon, and before bed coffee, the coffee offered to guests is known as “santsikuppi” which means another round of coffee and you don’t want to refuse it and you can say, “Ehkäpä vain puoli kuppia” meaning “maybe just a half a cup.” You will be served another full cup after every full cup until you ask for a half cup. Also in some of the traditional families, the hostess can’t drink coffee before the guests until they ask for a more full cup of coffee. 

Coffee Is A Part Of Life

Coffee Is A Part Of Life

Coffee is attached with all kinds of traditions, celebrations, and ceremonies. Coffee is served in almost occasions, be it a wedding, a christening, a funeral or a simple birthday party, it is considered very odd of there is no coffee on these occasions. The coffee served on different occasions has different names too like a farewell coffee is known as “läksiäiskahvit” when a Finn sports person wins some medal that coffee at a celebration is known as  “mitalikahvit”, and a traveling coffee is known as “matkakahvi”. 

Also, when a person wins in some election that coffee is known as “vaalikahvit” and you have your coffee at a cafe with a bun. The coffee and a bun together mean a person has done a really good job, in this case, won the election.

The Favorite Moomin Cup

The Favorite Moomin Cup

The Moomin cup is sold all over Finland and is very popular among the Finns. These cups are also collected by the locals and are said to be sold for 200 euros per piece. Annually, three to five Moomin cups are introduced in a market that makes them unique and collectible. The most valuable Moomin cups are the ones manufactured by Fazer cafe and the Stockmann department store. The 2004 Moomin cup was sold in an auction for around $4,000!

You might have got the gist why the people of Finn are so fond of coffee and why this country consumes the most in the whole world. This is what Finnish coffee culture is all about:

  • They prefer lightly roasted coffee.
  • Coffee is available 24/7.
  • Silence is gold, coffee is the reward. 
  • Coffee and their weird rules. 
  • There is a coffee for almost everything.

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